Story Box

Hand-picked feel good stories to keep you motivated as well as mindful during the COVID-19 crisis.

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THE BLACK DOT

THE BLACK DOT
One day, a professor entered his classroom and asked his students to prepare for a surprise test. They all waited anxiously at their desks for the exam to begin. The professor handed out the exams with the text facing down, as usual. Once he handed them all out, he asked the students to turn over the papers. To everyone’s surprise, there were no questions–just a black dot in the center of the paper. The professor, seeing the expression on everyone’s faces, told them the following: “I want you to write about what you see there.” The students, confused, got started on the inexplicable task. At the end of the class, the professor took all the exams, and started reading each one of them out loud in front of all the students. All of them, with no exception, defined the black dot, trying to explain its position in the center of the sheet. After all had been read, the classroom silent, the professor started to explain: “I’m not going to grade you on this, I just wanted to give you something to think about. No one wrote about the white part of the paper. Everyone focused on the black dot – and the same thing happens in our lives. However, we insist on focusing only on the black dot – the health issues that bother us, the lack of money, the complicated relationship with a family member, the disappointment with a friend. The dark spots are very small when compared to everything we have in our lives, but they are the ones that pollute our minds. Take your the eyes away from the black dots in your lives. Enjoy each one of your blessings, each moment that life gives you. Be happy and live a life filled with love!”

CORONA SURVIVORS

Corona Survivors
I have contracted Covid-19. The following is my experience so far. My main aim of writing this post is to talk about the amazing care I have received so far from Kasturba Hospital, Mumbai. I also want to spread awareness about my symptoms. SYMPTOMS: I am a student who was studying in London, and I had decided to fly back home due to the coronavirus outbreak. When I Ianded in Mumbai, and I had no symptoms whatsoever for the first two days. It was on day 3 that I began to feel very fatigued. Lots of sleeping and lethargy, and a mild fever (99°F). Next day, my fever increased to 100, and then up to a max of 101.6. I personally had NO respiratory symptoms. No sore or irritable throat, no coughing, no sneezing, nothing. There was vomiting one night, and otherwise generally persistent fever and fatigue. I also had severe dizziness, and on one day, I fainted while walking around at home. I fell on my face and broke a few teeth, and sustained some injuries to my chin and jaw. This seemed to be a signal that something was wrong, and despite physical injuries, the priority was to get tested for Covid 19. KASTURBA HOSPITAL: I went to Kasturba hospital the same night that I fainted. The test is a simple throat swab, and it took approximately 24 hours to get the results. The nurses and doctors on hand are friendly and helpful. Breakfast, lunch and dinner is served, which is usually roti, rice, two dals and a sabji, and food and warm water is available 24x7. Nurses hand out some tablets (such as multivitamins) to all patients, and they monitor if anyone has a fever or is feeling unwell in any way. They also go around giving people cough syrup, in case anyone requires it. After 24 hours of wait, I was told that I tested positive and needed to be transferred to another ward. In the morning, we were given breakfast, and nurses and doctors were in to do all sorts of tests. (BP, blood test, X ray etc). I must say I feel like I am in very good hands. The rooms and wards are CLEAN, the bathrooms are clean and there are multiple sanitiser bottles kept in every single room. Every day, there is someone who cleans the floor and changes the bedsheets. The doctors and nurses seem to know every patient and all their symptoms. I can only implore that everyone trusts that the doctors know what they are doing and are doing it to the best of their capacity. I have immense gratitude to everyone in the hospital who is taking care of me 🙏 Today, a doctor took rounds to every room and talked to every patient, just to make sure people's mental health was okay. He asked how we were doing, if there was anything bothering us, and told us to stay positive and strong. This was one of the nicest and most reassuring things to happen to me since I came to the hospital. I am extremely grateful to all the doctors, nurses and cleaners who are helping me right now and making sure I am comfortable. I think it is easy to criticise the government and government facilities but when you are actually here, you can see that everyone on the ground is doing the best they can with the resources that are available. I urge you all to follow the state's orders to stay indoors and stay isolated, and to not unnecessarily take actions that may put more pressure on the healthcare system. This is DAY 12 for me at Kasturba hospital, but time has passed quickly and I have seen many patients recover and get discharged :) The govt has also been persistently following up with everyone I was in contact with. Thankfully, my family and all other persons in contact with me tested negative and are safe. I hope you all stay indoors and safe as well. Take care

POSITIVE ATTITUDE

POSITIVE ATTITUDE
While medical staff across the world are wearing PPE (personal, protective equipment) such as masks and overalls to keep themselves safe as they treat patients with Covid-19, some have oped to put photos of themselves smiling, along with their name, to put worried patients at ease. This emergency doctor from San Diego, California shared his photo on Instagram, writing that his patients can now 'se a reassuring and comforting smile'.

WE ARE NEVER ALONE

WE ARE NEVER ALONE
Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youth’s rite of passage? His father takes him into the forrest…blindfolded…and leaves him….alone. He is required to sit on a stump the whole night…and not take off the blindfold until the ray of sun shines through it. He is all by himself. He cannot cry out for help to anyone.Once he survives the night…he is a MAN. He cannot tell the other boys of this experience. Each boy must come into his own manhood. The boy was terrified…could hear all kinds of noise…Beasts were all around him. Maybe even some human would hurt him. The wind blew the grass and earth… and it shook his stump. But he sat stoically…never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could be a man. Finally, after a horrific night…the sun appeared and he removed his blindfold. It was then that he saw his father…sitting on the stump next to him…at watch…the entire night. We are never truly alone. Even when we do not know it, our family and friends are watching out for us…sitting on a stump beside us.

DIABETICS SURVIVOR

Diabetics Survivor
A 51-year-old coronavirus patient with a history of diabetes and hypertension, who has been discharged from a hospital in Kolkata after recovery, on Tuesday said he was in a positive frame of mind during his treatment and that diabetics should not be worried as long as their sugar levels are under control. "Diabetics should not fear as they can be cured of the COVID-19 disease," Gopi Krishna Agarwal said, adding that since his sugar level is not very high, it was not much of a problem for him. Medical experts have been saying that if diabetes is kept under control, a coronavirus patient with diabetes can be treated as any other non-diabetic COVID-19 patient. The doctors were good and they have successfully done their job," he said.

THE STARFISH

THE STARFISH
Once a man was walking along a beach. The sun was shining and it was a beautiful day. Off in the distance he could see a person going back and forth between the surf’s edge and and the beach. Back and forth this person went. As the man approached, he could see that there were hundreds of starfish stranded on the sand as the result of the natural action of the tide. The man was stuck by the the apparent futility of the task. There were far too many starfish. Many of them were sure to perish. As he approached, the person continued the task of picking up starfish one by one and throwing them into the surf. As he came up to the person, he said: “You must be crazy. There are thousands of miles of beach covered with starfish. You can’t possibly make a difference.” The person looked at the man. He then stooped down and pick up one more starfish and threw it back into the ocean. He turned back to the man and said: “It sure made a difference to that one!”

WILL POWER TO LIVE "73-YEAR-OLD" SURVIVOR

Will power to live "73-year-old" survivor
A 73-year-old Delhi man with co-morbid conditions has recovered from COVID-19 and doctors have attributed his survival to medical care and the patient's "willpower to live". Manmohan Singh, a resident of Jangpura area in south Delhi, was discharged on Tuesday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at the LNJP Hospital. "He has so many co-morbid conditions resulted to old age, from ailments in heart, kidney to blood pressure and coronary heart conditions. It was his will power to live that pulled him through," Medical Superintendent of the hospital, J C Passey said. He attributed his recovery to patient care given by doctors at the hospital, high-quality equipment, and the patient's fighting spirit. If the man had given up, perhaps "we would have lost him," he added. His survival will give a lot of hope to other old patients and their families, many of whom are suffering from fear psychosis, he said.

INDIA WILL PLAY A MAJOR ROLE IN A COVID-19 VACCINE

India will play a major role in a covid-19 vaccine
23 April-20, the first human trials of a potential Covid-19 vaccine get underway from the University of Oxford. Scientists working on the vaccine say the injection they are developing has an 80% chance of success reports Sky News.Serum Institute of India, the world's largest vaccine maker by number of doses produced and sold globally. The 53-year-old company makes 1.5 billion doses every year, mainly from its two facilities in the western city of Pune. Firm has also partnered to mass produce a vaccine being developed by the University of Oxford and backed by the UK government. A genetically engineered chimpanzee virus would form the basis for the new vaccine. Human clinical trials began in Oxford. If all goes well, scientists hope to make at least a million doses by September.
*India Corona Statistics as of September 5, 15:33 IST
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